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The Canicular or Dog Days of Summer in Nicaragua

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Let it Rain
Precipitación promedio en el departamento de Rivas

The Canicular or Dog Days of Summer in Nicaragua are the hot, sultry days characterized by a drop or break in rainfall. Historically they follow the period of the rising of Sirius which in both Greek and Roman astrology is connected with heat, drought, sudden thunderstorms, lethargy, fever, mad dogs, and bad luck? In more modern times, they are known as the most uncomfortable days of summer and can start anytime from the 3rd of July to the 15th of August and can last anywhere from 30 to 60 days.

In Nicaragua, the CANICULAR PERIOD normally occurs between the 15th of July and the 15th of August in the regions of the Pacific and the western and central sectors of the North and Central Region. However, it can stretch to the end of August.

MAY 1st 2018

The weather forecasters at INETER (Nicaraguan Institute of Territorial Studies) have been working overtime, trying to predict the official start of the rainy season here in Nicaragua.

Their best guess; “Any time after the 15th of May, with the likelihood of rainfall amounts being 15% above or below normal in the first phase”.

The rainy season in Nicaragua has three phases:

Phase one, which usually starts about May 21st until July when it is interrupted by the Canicular, or Dog Days of Summer, when the hot, sultry days are characterized by a drop or even a break in rainfall.

Historically they follow the period of the rising of Sirius which in both Greek and Roman astrology is connected with heat, drought, sudden thunderstorms, lethargy, fever, mad dogs, and bad luck?

They can start anytime from the 3rd of July to the 15th of August and can last anywhere from 30 to 60 days.

Phase three is when rainfall levels increase to between 200 and 275 millimeters per month for September and October (in the Department of Rivas) before usually dropping of dramatically by the end of the year.

Guillermo González, Minister of the National System of Disaster Prevention (SINAPRED) is tasked with making sure the country is prepared for emergencies and monitors climate change which he says “Becomes more evident every year”. González explained that “Different components of the rainy period have to be will be taken into account, such as floods, strong winds, thunderstorms and swells”.

 

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